12th SHANGHAI BIENNALE

Power Station of Art Museum
ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTION SERIES
Acrylic and watercolour paper mounted on canvas, wall structure and blue filtered light, total length 8mt.
Sequence from dark lila-grey coloured pollutants to the deep clear blue sky.
2018

Atmospheric Pollution Series at "Where are the lions?", Meet Gallery Prague, CZ

Photo: Meet Factory

Detail of the pigmentation of the surface of the watercolor paper

Photo: Meet Factory

View of the ground floor hallway at the Power Station of Art Museum, total length 8 meters

Photo: Shanghai Biennale

View of the ground floor hallway at the Power Station of Art Museum, total length 8 meters.

Photo: Shanghai Biennale

View of the ground floor hallway at the Power Station of Art Museum, total length 8 meters.

Photo: Shanghai Biennale

Enclosed within the private atmosphere of a cloying fog, one yearns for a breeze that would disclose the landscape and relieve a sense of isolation. Floating along the walls of the space a series of painted panels carry the visitor through a subtle colour gradient, ranging from clear sky blue to a darkening greyscale of atmospheric pollutants. Traditionally screens are painted with landscapes, sometimes seen through mist. Ruiz-Tagle’s Atmospheric Pollution Series foregrounds the visual density of the air itself by intensifying its hues within monochromatic disks, whose saturated centres seem to evaporate outwards towards imperceptible limits, as though the pigments had been delivered to the screens by the wind itself. Seeking to bring the image into focus, one’s gaze sinks instead into its evanescent surface. The effect is dizzying. Isolating the visual delight of being immersed in a cloud from the intoxicating effects of breathing heavily polluted air, the series evokes both smog engulfing global cities and the ethereal fog of the camanchaca, an ultra-fine mist that sweeps over the Chilean coastline in winter. In its mesmerising aesthetic ambiguity, the work sustains a space of contemplation within our troubled atmosphere.

Text: Dehlia Hannah